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Collection / Decorative Objects / Boxes and Caskets

19863

An Exceptional ‘Royal’ Games Compendium Inlaid with the personal cypher of King Edward VII

An Exceptional ‘Royal’ Games Compendium Inlaid with the personal cypher of King Edward VII

Dimensions: H: 11.5 in / 29 cm  |  W: 17 in / 42 cm  |  D: 12.5 in / 32 cm
 

PRICE: £55,000

19863

An Exceptional ‘Royal’ Games Compendium
Inlaid with the personal cypher of King Edward VII
By George Betjemann & Sons

The case constructed in finely marked coromandel, having unusual studded nickel strapping and re-enforced rounded corners, the hinged lid inlaid with the personal cypher of King Edward VII and secured with a patent Bramah lock, opening to reveal a satinwood-lined interior, with conforming hinged fall-front, the top tier with two swivelling trays including red & white ivory chess pieces, checkers and dice, the removable central compartment with sets of dominos, whist counters and numerous sets of playing cards displayed underneath the coromandel and ivory chessboard fitted into the lid; a pull-out drawer with flush handle containing counters and a pair of dice shakers, sliding to reveal the bottom compartment fitted with a roulette wheel, the hinged fall-front panel fitted with “finger” pointers and cribbage boards. Supplied by “Drew & Sons / Piccadilly . W”, the back of the mounts stamped “G.B.” for the maker George Betjemann.
English, circa 1905

The hardware re-plated, some game fittings are later replacements
 

The royal cypher is a monogram or monogram-like device that consists of a sovereign's initials, usually the first letter of their name and title, and is often surmounted by a crown. The cypher is used as a symbol of the monarch's authority and is found on various state documents, insignia, and public buildings. In England, the cypher is approved by the monarch, and belongs to them personally.

Historically, the use of royal monograms can be traced back for centuries, with some Medieval documents and coins displaying them. The use of the royal cypher became more codified through the subsequent Tudor and Stuart reigns and was widely used by the 19th century with Queen Victoria’s “VR” (Victoria Regina).

The only instances when the royal cypher appears on objects is on the monarch’s personal property, as was the case with this games compendium.
 

REF No. 9033

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